NRA ILA

Boston Top Cop: City Residents Do Not "Need" to Own Shotguns, Rifles

On July 23, Boston Police Commissioner William Evans told Boston Public Radio (WGBH) that residents of Boston do not need shotguns or rifles.  I don't agree with that. Having long guns--rifles and shotguns--especially here in the city of Boston. I think we should have, as the local authority, some say in the matter. [And] the federal [government] doesn't really allow us to have the discretion that we want in these particular cases. ...For the most part, nobody in the city needs a shotgun. Nobody needs a rifle. 

The Ordeal of Shaneen Allen

In October of 2013, a Pennsylvania resident named Shaneen Allen drove into New Jersey’s Atlantic County and was pulled over by police for an “unsafe lane change.” When the detaining officer arrived at her car window, Allen informed him that she was carrying a concealed firearm, and presented her Pennsylvania carry license as proof of eligibility. Unbeknownst to her at the time, however, was that New Jersey is among the 20 states that do not recognize Pennsylvania’s permit. In consequence, she was arrested. If convicted of the charges that the state has elected to bring, she will be locked in prison for up to a decade.

Appellate Court Upholds Privacy Law, Tells Anti-Gun Doctors to Take a Powder

In a victory for gun owners who pay to visit doctors for medical care, and not the political opinions of their physicians, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit has upheld Florida’s Firearm Owner’s Privacy Act. This law was passed after an escalating series of events in which patients were harassed or denied access to services because they refused to be interrogated by their doctors about their ownership of firearms. The case, Wollschlaeger v. Governor of Florida, vindicated Florida’s attempt to protect patients from being forced to divulge personal information that is irrelevant to their own medical treatment.

Boston Police Commissioner: I Say Who Needs a Gun!

Writing for a majority of the Supreme Court in District of Columbia v. Heller, which recognized an individual right under the Second Amendment to possess firearms for self-defense, Justice Scalia observed: “The very enumeration of the right takes out of the hands of government … the power to decide on a case-by-case basis whether the right is really worthinsisting upon.” 

Colorado's Experience Soundly Refutes Common Anti-gun Talking Point

Last month, while addressing a group of Colorado sheriffs, Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper spoke on the topic of the state's 2013 measure outlawing almost all private transfers of firearms. According to the Denver Post, Hickenlooper told the sheriffs, "I think we screwed that up completely... we were forming legislation without basic facts."  A newAssociated Press report examining Colorado background check data in the first year of the new law proves the accuracy of Hickenlooper's statement, and should (although likely won't) end the repetition of an already discredited anti-gun background check factoid.

Beretta Leaves Maryland, Finds Welcome Reception in Tennessee

The large-scale exodus of gun manufacturers from states inhospitable to the Second Amendment continued this week, with Beretta USA announcing that it would be moving its Maryland operation to Gallatin, Tennessee. In doing so, Beretta joins firearms and firearm parts manufacturers such as Remington, Kahr Arms, PTR Industries, Sturm, Ruger & Company, and Magpul Industries, all of which have either quit states hostile to gun owners, or chosen to expand their operations in more friendly locales. Beretta's move is poised to cost the so-called "Free State" millions in investment and 160 jobs.

Homeowner fights off burglar, WRTV, Indianapolis, Ind. 07/22/14

A man arrived at his Indianapolis home, noticed that the house had been disturbed, and heard a suspicious noise coming from the second floor. The homeowner retrieved a gun, went to investigate, and discovered a burglar. The homeowner shot the criminal, prompting him to flee. Police captured the intruder a short time later. 

Doctor fires back at Pennsylvania hospital gunman

A doctor told police that a patient fatally shot a caseworker at their hospital complex before the doctor pulled out his own gun and exchanged fire with him and wounded him, a prosecutor said Thursday night.

Colorado: Gun law based on flawed estimate

A law expanding background check requirements on Colorado gun sales has been in effect for about a year, and an Associated Press analysis of state data compiled during that span shows the projected impact was vastly overstated in a key budget report.

NRA kicks off voter registration drive with provocative ad

A suggestive ad by the NRA for its voter registration campaign will likely get tongues wagging.The spot features a father talking to his son in a somber tone about something that’s not a toy, but is important to protect their family. He unlocks a case to reveal … a voter registration card.

Illinois: Concealed carry rules tough on out-of-state residents

More than a year after Illinois passed a law allowing citizens to carry concealed firearms, the argument over a part of the Firearm Concealed Carry Act that makes it difficult for out-of-state residents to carry here is still smoldering.

Shaneen Allen, race and gun control

Last October, Shaneen Allen, 27, was pulled over in Atlantic County, N.J. The officer who pulled her over says she made an unsafe lane change. During the stop, Allen informed the officer that she was a resident of Pennsylvania and had a conceal carry permit in her home state. She also had a handgun in her car. Had she been in Pennsylvania, having the gun in the car would have been perfectly legal. But Allen was pulled over in New Jersey, home to some of the strictest gun control laws in the United States.

Tennessee restaurant owner welcomes gun owners

A Maryville, Tennessee, restaurant owner has placed a sign in the window of her business welcoming gun owners — a move she says has brought in more customers and saved her business from closing.

Canada: Conservatives’ gun law changes would ease transportion restrictions, require mandatory safety courses

The Conservative government is proposing new legislation that would ease restrictions on transporting firearms, make firearms-safety courses mandatory for first-time gun owners and prevent people convicted of spousal assault from legally owning guns.Under the government’s proposed Common Sense Firearms Licensing Act, gun owners who allow their weapon permits to lapse will be given a grace period to renew them.

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